And So It Was Blogged (XI)

Friday, June 11, 2010

This week was another fast and furious one. It was like Sunday, Wednesday and—Bam!— here we are at Friday. With my work deadlines, I barely had time to make my usual Internet rounds. Truthfully, the week is kind of a blur. But still I managed to get some links together for the Best of the Blogs—my rundown of what I thought were the prime bloggy cuts from this 23rd week of 2010.

1. Show Me the Money (No, Really. Where Is It?)
A mom unleashed this doozy on me: She knows a mother with four children under the age of four. As in, she has TWO sets of twins. Ages 3.5 and 6 months. What in tarnation!? I can’t. Then I saw this story about the cost of raising kiddies these days. It can run you up to $475K, says the Department of Agriculture. And that’s not even including college. But the story also offers a few savings tips … like having three or more of the little darlings. Somehow I don’t think this is a big comfort to Twin Factory Mom.

2. Nanny Rights
I still can’t say that I know the difference between a nanny and a babysitter in this town. I mean, I know what babysitting meant when I was a kid. Clearly, not the same thing ’round here. But what I also didn’t understand about household/domestic workers is how few rights they had in this state. New York magazine ran this feature story about the 10-year-long fight that’s been going for legislation. The stories in the piece about nanny-parent relationships gone way wrong are disturbing. Grown men and women treating other people with total disregard … that’s something I’ll never get.

Somewhat related, babble.com‘s latest celebrity slideshow is … yes, celeb kids and their nannies, with the question: Who’s really raising the children? (Sometimes I wonder if the paparazzi have kids, much more a conscience.)

3. Baby Bump or Just Big Lunch?
When I was pregnant and taking the subway to my office, I was always utterly flabbergasted by how many people did not offer me a seat. I would poke my very pregnant belly into their newspaper and glare, but nothing. Often it would take another young woman, who spotted me from waaay down at the other end of the train, to wave me over and offer up her seat. The NYT‘s Motherlode posted about this very thing yesterday. Apparently, according to a BBC story, it’s not clear whether the woman is preggers or simply fat. Really? Come on, men. Do better.

4. Hot Topics
Well before I even started thinking about maybe having a child, I had heard the autism/vaccine debate. And while I was pregnant, I couldn’t hear this enough: “Do you plan on vaccinating your baby? You know it causes autism, right?” First, what a thing to tell an expectant mother and second, are you serious? Research had long proved what I had already believed: there is no connection. (Sorry, Jenny McCarthy.) And recently, a retraction of the 1998 study that started this whole thing.

Another controversial topic in the blogs this week was same-sex marriage and parents. Over at salon.com’s Broadsheet, they looked at a new study that says the kids of lesbian parents “turn out just as well-adjusted as their peers.” Moreover, children with two mamas have more self-confidence and fewer behavioral problems.

Then at momversation.com, the mothers discuss another longstanding argument: nature vs. nurture. The ladies were talking about this in terms of your child’s personality. How much does one factor in over the other? If you’re baby girl is absolutely brilliant, was that your genes or all the flash cards and books you shoved in her face? Check out the conversation here.

Also on momversation, there was a call-back to a recent wrangle about pregnancy’s effect on our bodies.The site’s newest blogger (a Canadian!) Carolyn McTighe talks honestly about her body after four kids.

5. Photo Finish
Fridays, I like to try to end posts with a photo. And where do I often go for inspired images? Correct, Shutter Sisters. This month’s One-Word Project is, simply, “Hello.” There have been some cool interpretations of the word, like this by htekmo:

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