Can They Make a Movie About Us?

Monday, May 23, 2011

There I was, a week ago, sitting in a near-empty movie theater trying to laugh away my nerves. The nerves part came from the fact that my little family was waiting to hear whether we landed a house in Connecticut or not. If “not,” that meant starting our home search from Square One. And no one was looking forward to that.

The laughter? That part came strictly from the movie we were watching: Bridesmaids.

Photo: Universal Studios

A friend (new mom to a 2-month-old darling puffalump) and I decided to leave the dads at home with les bébés and head to a mantinee.  We could have counted the number of people in the stadium-style seats on two hands. We sort of felt like we somehow stumbled on an old scroll secret: Moms, get thee to the theat-ah by noon and doth have a grand time well-nigh alone.

The movie was a perfect blend of hilarious and heartwarming. It was a film about friendship and how it—this vital thing—can sometimes get mangled as we move through this life. The main character (Kristin Wiig)’s childhood best bud (Maya Rudolph) is getting married and naturally chooses her homegirl as the Maid of Honor. But Wiig’s character’s life is the complete opposite of running smoothly. She’s stalled in a lot ways. Anyway, without spoiling it for you … some funny stuff happens. Some gross stuff happens. And some very sweet stuff happens.

It was during one of the sweet scenes near the end of the movie that I found myself feeling nostalgic and a little sad about some of my own friendships. Yes, we all know that life is on a forward-only track, and that many of our trains move at very different speeds. But there’s something about the Motherhood/Parenthood station on this ride that feels like the doors have slid open to an entirely different world, one where night and day are jumbled and you are holding on to anything that might help you get your bearings.

Those early stages of New Mommy Life, man, do you need your friends.

Friends to tell you there is indeed light at the end of the tunnel  … because they have seen with their own eyes.

Friends to listen and nod along to your hysteria (“Yes, the baby is definitely waiting until you close your eyes to start balling. Clearly.”)

Friends to share the giddy when you make it into the shower, put on a coordinated (clean!) outfit and head out to get a cup of tea or a pedicure alone. Without a diaper bag.

But the miserable joke is, it’s at this same early stage of mommydom that you barely have time to sit down for a meal much more connect with your friends. Maybe there’s a movie to be written here … all about friendships through motherhood. Cracked nipples, diaper rash, sleep deprivation, C-section scars, tear-soaked pillowcases. Oh, the hilarity is spilling off the page.  Somebody get me Judd Apatow’s email address!

3 Comments
  • 1
    Kristin says:

    I love your “forward-moving trains at different speeds” analogy. Yes.

    Can’t wait to see your screenplay! :)

    I’ll probably only see this when it gets to Netflix, but I’m glad to hear I have something else to add to my cue.

  • 2
    Kendra says:

    I love this: “Motherhood/Parenthood station on this ride that feels like the doors have slid open to an entirely different world, one where night and day are jumbled and you are holding on to anything that might help you get your bearings.” It is so so so true. Sometimes I think of the movie Sliding Doors, when Gwyneth Paltrow’s life splits into two: one future if she makes the train and catches her husband cheating and leaves him, the other if she misses the train and doesn’t catch him and stays married. All those trains on different tracks…

    • 2.1
      Ms. Mary Mack says:

      Yes! “Sliding Doors”…my goodness, yes. I actually liked that movie, more the idea of it. That a split second can change your entire life. Thanks for bringing that back into my mind, Kendra. Hello, Netflix. :-)